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I went to see Anna Karenina and was struck dumb by the clothing. The grand figure of romantic tragedy was swathed in ethereal silks and luxurious furs. It made me think about how a modern millennium woman could translate the look, for work or to go partying.

Earlier this year, Jessica Biel was photographed wearing a long embroidered coat by Dolce & Gabbana. As if Anna had borrowed Count Vronsky's jacket and thrown it over a filmylacydress. In real life you could get a military jacket from a thrift store, add some embroidery patches and pair that with a lace blouse and pencil skirt. Add a sparkling pin or headband.

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Anna's gowns have an asymmetrical, quality. Everything is subtly askew. Those floating mullet dresses from the summer can be paired with leggings and high embroidered boots or shoes for a look that goes from day to dancefloor. It's not exactly the same, but unless you have thousands of dollars to drop, you won't be coming up on any subtly cut chiffon ballgowns any time soon, so improvisation is key.

Another good pairing is a long pleated chiffon skirt (remember how they were everywhere this summer?) with a ruffled blouse, but wrap a corset or bustier over the blouse and then a thin belt over that. It's a bit 80s, but it could work. Why? Because Anna wears an amazing red gown that looks as if her jeweled corset were peeking through. It shows that she's losing control, and her real self is peeking through. it's also wonderfully glamorous. Just try it. You might meet your Vronsky and spend the night flirting. (Just don't make the same mistake Anna made, ok?)

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