Loose bouncy curls always remind me of Marilyn Monroe. There are very few things I obsess over. She is one of them. Triggered by Joyce Carol Oates' "Blonde," a fictionalized yet factually accurate biography of the iconic beauty, I read the seven hundred paged Pulitzer nominated novel from cover to cover in just forty-eight hours as each page drew me deeper into the mesmerization of Marilyn Monroe. The book chronicles her under-glamorous beginnings as Norma Jeane Mortenson, her transformation into the most lusted after movie star in the world, and concludes with her untimely death shrouded in mystery and tragedy. Through the years, I've read almost every Marilyn biography, studied all the photo books, bookmarked her Wikipedia page, visited online forums discussing conspiracy theories surrounding her death, and watched her greatest hits over and over again. This past August, I even contemplated attending a pool party thrown by her fan club commemorating her 50th anniversary memorial but chickened out at the last moment. Yes, I'm obsessed.

The obsession is not an absolute fawnation of her beauty as it is an everlasting fascination with the complexity of her duality. To the world, she was Marilyn Monroe, the projection of a one-dimensional blonde bombshell whose beauty and sex appeal catapulted her to fame. But away from the prying eyes of the public stood Norma Jeane, an insecure and lonely foster child who yearned to be loved and taken seriously for who she was and not what she projected. She silently battled dark demons as her hereditary predisposition towards mental and reproductive illnesses haunted her day and night. She was a thinker, loved to read (married playright Arthur Miller), and articulated poignant observations about the way of the world. She was living proof that you can't judge a book by its cover. Her true self was buried under layers of projections and conjured beliefs which is why I find it so fascinating to uncover the woman behind the movie star. Marilyn Monroe was a legend. Norma Jeane was a tragedy.

I didn't dress up as Marilyn Monroe or Norma Jeane for this outfit post. I wouldn't dare. Merely, the curls activated a need to share my thoughts on her. I wore this outfit to a holiday party in Westwood a few weeks ago. The classic shape of the Mia Melon dress and the festive color is just so timeless. I can see myself wearing it for years to come. The vaguely off the shoulder neckline is a subtle nod to retro fashion and is understatedly sexy. I was also quite excited to wear my emerald green vintage necklace as it's been sitting in my jewelry box for way too long. I bought it at an estate sale and it's one my favorite but rarely worn pieces.
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dress: c/o Mia Melon
shoes: L.A.M.B {get it here}
necklace: vintage

{live fabulously}

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